19 Observations from Dr. Ed Stetzer on Planting Churches in the U.S.

  1.  Planters leading fast-growing church plants revealed a higher Ridley Assessment Score than those leading struggling church plants.
  2. 78.3 percent of fast-growing church planters were full-time rather than bi- vocational. Only 61.5 percent of struggling church planters were full-time.
  3. Only 8.8 percent of fast-growing church planters were given salary support past three years. On the other hand, 44.3 percent of struggling church planters were supported past three years.
  4. 75 percent of fast-growing church planters were given additional financial support from a sponsoring agency. Only 48.1 percent of struggling church plants were given additional financial support.
  5. While receiving additional funding, a majority of fast-growing church plants received from $1,000 to $25,000 extra over a one to two-year period.
  6. 63.3 percent of fast-growing church planters raised additional funding for the church plant. Only 23 percent of struggling church planters raised additional funding.
  7. Planters leading fast-growing church plants were given more freedom to cast their own vision and choose their own target audience, and they had more freedom in the spending of finances.
  8. 88.3 percent of church planters involved in fast-growing church plants were a part of a church planting team. Only 11.5 percent of planters involved in struggling church plants had a church planting team.
  9. Fast-growing church plants had multiple paid staff. Two paid staff members was a majority among these church plants.
  10. A majority of fast-growing church plants utilized two or more volunteer staff as part of the church planting team prior to public launch.
  11. Fast-growing church plants had a larger number of individuals involved in the core group prior to launch. While struggling church plants had twenty five or less in a core group, fast-growing church plants had between twenty-six and fifty.
  12. Fast-growing church plants utilized more seed families than struggling church plants.
  13. Fast-growing church plants used both preview services and small groups to build the initial core group.
  14. Fast-growing church plants that used preview services used three or more of these services prior to public launch. A large contingent of these churches used over five.
  15. 75 percent of fast-growing churches had over 101 attendees at their first service. By contrast, 80.4 of struggling church plants had 100 or less.
  16. Fast-growing church plants had children and teen ministries in place at time of ministries and offered at least three ministry opportunities to first-time attendees.
  17. Fast-growing church plants used a contemporary style of worship far more often than struggling church plants.
  18. 56.7 percent of fast-growing church plants taught financial stewardship during the first six months from public launch. By contrast only 38.5 percent of struggling church plants taught financial stewardship.
  19. 80 percent of fast-growing church plants gave 10 percent or more of their monthly budget toward outreach and evangelism. Only 42.3 percent of struggling church plants give over 10 percent of their monthly income to outreach and evangelism.  

(These 19 observations are taken from THE STATE OF CHURCH PLANTING IN THE UNITED STATES: RESEARCH OVERVIEW AND QUALITATIVE STUDY OF PRIMARY CHURCH PLANTING ENTITIES by Dr. Ed Stetzer and Dr. Warren Bird)

http://www.christianitytoday.com/edstetzer/2009/january/state-of-church-planting.html